CQS FINISHES CHALLENGING RACE

Ludde Ingvall’s ground breaking super maxi CQS has taken line honours in what has been described as a challenging Alandia Surrsaari Race, taking just over 24 hours to complete the course. With light winds throughout the race, the course record remains unchanged, still held by Ludde from a previous year.

Talking about the race after the finish, the skipper said, “the race was a light wind race, we don’t mind light air, but we need good angles. As you saw when we came in, it was just 4 knots of breeze and we could do 11 knots. The problem was we never had good angles, so we were gybing and tacking all the way around the course.”

The race, a 168 mile dash from Helsinki around Surrsaari Island and back to Helsinki, took the fleet into Russian waters for part of the course.

This event was a home coming for Ludde, who was born and raised in Helsinki but now lives in Sydney, Australia, “this race means a lot to me, because this is where I was born, this is my home town, this is where my Dad taught me to sail”.

Despite the slow race, the skipper had a beaming smile when he finished, “doing this race with my cousin Michael Hintze and all my mates, this was incredible,” he explained. Amongst the crew he had friends who have either sailed with him or against him since childhood, “and now we’ve all sailed together on the same boat,” he added with great pride.

He will now be able to get his name engraved on the trophy that he donated several years ago, in memory of his father, for the line honours winner of the race.

The overall results will not be known until all the other yachts have finished.

LUDDE INGVALL & CQS READY TO RACE.

Ludde Ingvall has pulled together a top crew for his super maxi CQS to contest the Alandia Surrsaari Race out of Helsinki, starting on the evening of 9th June, in which he hopes to win the line honours trophy that he donated himself, in memory of his late father.

The crew is a carefully selected fusion for permanent team members and talented Scandinavian sailors. Regular crew include Boat Captain Tony Long (NZL) and Alan Turner (NZL), while amongst the locals who have joined the boat for this race are Markus Roshier (FIN) and Jonas Wackenhuth (SWE).

The 168 nautical mile race is a dash around Surrsaari island, starting and finishing off Haukilahti, and rounding Helsinki, Kalbadagrund and Kotka lighthouses on the way out and back.

Although Ludde hasn’t sailed in Finnish waters for about 10 years, he is still the current record holder for the race, and is hoping he can beat his own time to lower the benchmark.

However, the weather gods may not smile on him, as predominantly light winds are forecast for the area for the period of the race. Although CQS is a 100 foot super maxi, with a new and very efficient rig, the winds may not be strong enough for her to reach her full potential.

Winning the coveted line honours trophy should be more of an achievable goal, as CQS is by far the largest boat in the race. Having donated it, Ludde commented, “now I’d like to get my name on that trophy”.

 

LUDDE INGVALL’S CQS ARRIVES IN HELSINKI

Ludde Ingvall and his ground breaking super-maxi CQS have arrived in Helsinki ready to contest the Alandia Surrsaari Race, starting 9th June. Ludde, who was born and bred in Helsinki, has returned to his origins to take part in this 168 nautical mile race.

It is about ten years since Ludde last sailed in Finnish waters, but he is the current record holder for this race, and has presented the trophy for the first monohull to finish, in honour of his late father, “now I’d like to get my name on that trophy,” he commented.

The skipper, who now lives in Sydney, Australia, originally came to sailing fame when he skippered Union Bank of Finland in the 1989/90 Whitbread Round the World Race. Since then he has won the famous Sydney to Hobart Race twice, as well as England’s equally renowned Fastnet Race.

CQS is the boat with which he most recently won the Sydney to Hobart Race, but has undergone a major update to take advantage of the most recent developments in underwater foils, canting keels and rig developments, as well as being stretched by eight feet from its original size.

Ludde is gathering around him a crew of some of Scandinavia’s top sailors who have done round the world races and America’s Cups, along with some of his regular team.

The Alandia Surrsaari race, is a 168 nautical mile dash around Surrsaari island, starting and finishing of Haukilahti, and rounding Helsinki, Kalbadagrund and Kotka lighthouses on the way out and back.

LUDDE INGVALL RETURNS HOME FOR SURRSAARI RACE.

Skipper, Ludde Ingvall

Skipper, Ludde Ingvall

World renowned sailor Ludde Ingvall is returning to his origins to contest the Alandia Surrsaari Race, starting 9th June from Helsinki. Ludde, who grew up in Helsinki is bringing his ground breaking super-maxi CQS to contest the race, a 98 foot boat with underwater wings to help lift it to skim across the surface.

The skipper, who now lives in Sydney, Australia, originally came to sailing fame when he skippered Union Bank of Finland in the 1989/90 Whitbread Round the World Race. Since then he has won the famous Sydney to Hobart Race twice, as well as England’s equally renowned Fastnet Race.

CQS is the boat with which he most recently won the Sydney to Hobart Race, but has undergone a major update to take advantage of the most recent developments in underwater foils, canting keels and rig developments, as well as being stretched by eight feet from its original size.

It is about ten years since Ludde last sailed in Finnish waters, but he is the current record holder for this race, and has presented the trophy for the first monohull to finish, in honour of his late father, “now I’d like to get my name on that trophy,” he commented.

Ludde is gathering around him a crew of some of Scandinavia’s top sailors who have done round the world races and America’s Cups, along with some of his regular team.

The Alandia Surrsaari race, is a 168 nautical mile dash around Surrsaari island, starting and finishing of Haukilahti, and rounding Helsinki, Kalbadagrund and Kotka lighthouses on the way out and back.

LUDDE INGVALL’S EUROPEAN TOUR WITH CQS

Ludde Ingvall’s distinctive super maxi CQS has arrived in European waters for a summer tour of races in places as divergent as Finland and Malta. The 98 foot boat, with which Ludde contested last year’s Rolex Sydney to Hobart Race, will leave Gosport, England, in the next few days for a delivery trip to Helsinki.

While in the Finnish capital, where the skipper grew up, CQS will contest the Alandia Surrsaari Race, a 168 nautical mile dash around Surrsaari Island, starting 9th June, a race for which he hold the course record, and has presented the trophy for first monohull, in honour of his late father.

From there the boat will travel to Stockholm to take part in the Gotland Runt, a 350 nautical mile race around Gotland, one of the classics of the northern European summer, which starts 2nd July.

CQS will then return to England where she will again be based in Gosport, and will compete in three of England’s premier sailing events, the Royal Ocean Racing Club’s Channel Race, Cowes Week, and the Rolex Fastnet Race.

The Channel Race, which starts 22nd July is a short, 160 nautical mile, sprint around the English Channel, starting from Cowes on the Isle of Wight.

During the world famous Cowes Week regatta, CQS will join other maxi yachts in a three race “Triple Crown” series of races around the Solent.

The final event in the English part of the European Tour will be the Rolex Fastnet Race, the 605 nautical mile classic race from Cowes around the Fastnet Rock off the south west coast of Ireland, and back to finish in Plymouth. This is a race he was won in the past.

Ludde and the CQS team will finish their European Tour in the Mediterranean, taking part in Trieste’s Barcolana Race, and Malta’s Middle Seas Race. The Barcolana is a 15 nautical mile dash around the Bay of Trieste, which is claimed to be the bigger sailing race in the world, with thousands of boats taking part.

The Middle Seas Race starts and finishes in Malta’s Valletta Harbour, and is another of the world’s 600 nautical mile classics, alongside the Fastnet, Newport to Bermuda and Sydney to Hobart races. It takes the fleet of boats north around Sicily, followed by a spectacular round of the volcano Stromboli, before turning south around more islands, and back to Valletta.

CQS HEADING BACK TO NEW ZEALAND

Hobart, Australia: 29th December 2016

Ludde Ingvall’s super maxi CQS will leave Hobart soon, and head back to New Zealand, where the programme of developing the DSS technology will continue, while Ingvall and his sponsor, Sir Michael Hintze discuss the ongoing event schedule.

Chris Skinner, the boat captain, said he expected there to be a good weather window for them to leave on Friday for the Tasman Crossing, which should take about five days.

Both ingvall and Sir Michael have said they are very pleased with the boat’s performance in the Rolex Sydney to Hobart, having shown some stunning bursts of speed before the DSS board broke.

Skinner, who will skipper the boat for the delivery trip back to New Zealand said, “there is a good weather pattern coming up on Friday, it should give us a downhill slide all the way. We will leave the broken DSS board in place for the crossing, because it takes about a day to remove it, and we want to get going.”

Other than the damage to the DSS board, the rest of the boat came through the Rolex Sydney Hobart Race unscathed, “the guys at Southern Ocean Marine have built a beautiful and strong boat,” commented Ingvall, “everything else on the boat has worked really well, I’m very happy with the hull and rig.”

When the decision has been made about the rest of the sailing programme, CQS will be shipped from New Zealand to the venture for the next event.

CQS FINISHES ROLEX SYDNEY TO HOBART 2016

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Hobart, Australia: 28th December 2016.

“It was tough, the Hobart race is always tough, but by Hobart standards it was an easy Hobart,” was Chris Dickson’s summary of the 2 days and 3 hours it had taken CQS to complete the Rolex Sydney to Hobart Race.

Ludde Ingvall’s super maxi crossed the finishing line of the race at 16:13:12 on Wednesday in seventh place, after spending the previous 12 hours creeping painfully slowly towards Battery Point in Hobart, the traditional finish in the Derwent river.

Despite the slow finish, sponsor and crew member Sir Michael Hintze was grinning from ear to ear when the boat finally docked, saying he was ready for the next race.

“It was great,” he told the waiting crowd, “the fulfilment of a childhood dream. The technology and engineering in the boat is fascinating, and we’re still learning about it.”

Ludde Ingvall the skipper, and cousin of Sir Michael, talked about the damage to their DSS (Dynamic Stability System) board, which broke early in the race. “First the tips, like on an airplane wing, broke off, which caused the flaps to tear off as well.

“That slowed us up a lot, but before they broke we could really feel the boat lift up and take off, it’s a very exciting development, and we are already talking to the designers and engineers about how to improve it.”

The first twenty four hours of the race had been fast with good east to north easterly winds, and only a brief period of light winds on the first night. It was in the early hours of Wednesday morning the wind just shut off and CQS along with several other boats had a very slow and frustrating sail across Storm Bay and up the Derwent River.

NOT STORM BAY

JUST OUTSIDE OF HOBART: 28th December 2016

 

At 07:30 this morning CQS was virtually becalmed in Storm Bay, only a few miles from the entrance to Hobart’s Derwent River. “Storm Bay is not living up to its name,” commented Michael Rummel from the boat, “we are doing 1 knot at the moment.”

 

He said that they had maintained good speed all night, with a decent breeze, but the wind shut off at around 06:00, and their progress slowed to a crawl.

 

Family and friends waiting on Constitution Dock in Hobart have seen the ETA pushed back and back. Late last night CQS was expected to finish at about 05:00, but as the sky started to lighten before dawn this was pushed back to 07:00. Now it seems that a 09:00 finish is optimistic.

 

After yesterday’s beautiful sunny weather, Hobart is now a cloudy, soggy, dripping mess, and the crew of CQS, instead of being covered in salt spray, have rain water running off the sails.

 

 

REACHING TOWARDS THE DERWENT

Not far from Hobart, Tasmania: 27th December 2016

CQS reports this afternoon that they are on a fast reach towards the entrance to Hobart’s Derwent River, the team have crossed Bass Straight, and have had a relatively uneventful day.

“Nothing much has changed since this morning,” they said. “We’ve got 20 to 25 knots of mostly easterly breeze, and a 1 to 2 metre swell.” With the wind angle they have, CQS is able to point her bow straight towards the next turning point.

“We’ve averaged around 18 knots since this morning, and have cleared Bass Straight without any dramas,” they concluded.

The race tracker currently shows them 63 nautical miles east of Flinders Island, with an ETA in Hobart of 04:44am tomorrow morning.

A CHALLENGING NIGHT

27th December 2016: 7.30am update

The CQS team have described it as “a challenging night,” via sat phone this morning, adding that they had done quite a few sail changes.

 

Talking about their progress south, he said that CQS had been achieving good speeds yesterday afternoon and evening, but then the wind dropped during the night.

 

Skipper, Ludde Ingvall told us this morning that the breeze was building again, and they now had 13 to 14 knots of wind from the east, and the were sailing at 16 to 17 knots. He said, “the wind direction allows us to point right at the mark, so we are going in a straight line.

 

He explained that they were getting a lot of vibration from the DSS board since various bits had broken off, and they were trying to adjust its position to minimize the effect of the turbulence this vibration caused. Ludde reckoned that they were 10% to 15% below they potential because of this.

 

At the time of contacting them, CQS was 59 nautical miles south east of Gabo Island.